(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Microcosm"

^X^As". 











'^ 



v% ""■ 



% 



e$y ^ e<?^ V 4, % ^/> '^C 








■« 























£> 



<^ 







.'i^ 



% 
% 






.S'' 






> -0^ 



^^•^v 



<^ 



^^ 






#>;>^ 



S.cg 



^^' 



%^ 



i 














MICROCOSM 

Simmons College 

Boston^ 
Massachusetts 



Microcosm Staff 
Co-editors: 



Marilyn J. Cugini 
Lisa DeVincenzo 



Advertising/Fundraising Manager: Nancy Fuller 
Business Manager: Sarah S. Tucker 



Circulation Manager: 
Copy Editors: 



Layout: 



Photography: 



Writers: 



Cover Design: 

Blueprint Design, 
pages 4 and 5: 

Endsheet Design: 

Senior Portraits: 

Faculty Advisor: 



Natalie Cilson 

Susan Rao 
Holly Sutherland 

Kathy Dziewisz, Editor 
Susan McNeff 
Susan Rao 
Heather Smith 
Luanne Williams 

Denise Miserlis, Editor 
Ana Valle-Bachrach 
Linda Brooks 
Tammy Feiges 
Geoffrey B. Poore 
P. Sarah Tucker 

Catherine Geanoulis 
Becky Schnaper 
Ann Marie Starzyk 
Holly Sutherland 

Jennifer Rose 

Cynthia Proctor 



Heather Smith 
Loring Studios 
Virginia Bratton 








Contents 

Introduction 1 

Seniors 1 7 

Departments 87 

Activities 1 09 

Administration 123 

Directory 133 



.r- 



\^T 



\\ 





m ftt ^ 



if ill 




* 



When the freshman class of 1 981 came to Simmons for orientation on that hot August day in 



■Mp 



1977, theirthoughts about graduation were still part of a distant dream. They would cover a lot 
of ground in the next four years — growing academically, socially, emotionally — and with a 
certain amount of uncertainty, they were prepared to face it, as a group, and as individuals. 

Each woman was accepted to Simmons because she had something unique to contribute to 
the College, and most came because of the unique professional-academic education Simmons 
had to offer. The future loomed ahead with all their hopes and goals, and although they had no 
idea of exactly what was in store for them, they expected the years spent at Simmons to be a 
positive experience. When graduation day finally arrived, they would have changed. 

The class of 1981 endured the seemingly endless construction to enjoy the completed 
renovations of the Main College Building,made possible through PRIDE I. Who could forget ._— . 
the antiquated, dreary interior of the MCB, or walking carefully through rubble and building ^ 
materials as the building was transformed into a thoroughly modern facility, accessible to the-^fj-CJ 
handicapped? Pleasant classrooms, the Fens cafeteria, the commuter lounge and lockers, and vll-^W 
the student activities wing made Simmons women proud of their college. During the summer 
of 1980, the much-needed additions to the media facilities were completed and included 
darkrooms, a fully equipped television studio, and a media workroom. The second phase of ... r^^iyfTTyi py 
the PRIDE campaign, a ten-million dollar fund drive to increase faculty salaries, began in ^ ' ^" "^ '"'• ^^^^ 
1980. . _ . -tfc 




?i-- - >^^xj> 



itted 



1 5 1" r rt M'\ 



' ' \* ~ ^"^^ ' '-^ 




OftfiJ 



W I ' Till -III 



Zto' 9 






FrVATlOKi A-A. 



OPfoAt»4^ 



Hr — rr 




3 -lo 



*i 



» It 



1 



&-a" 



* 



Ctf>u»JTeit^ 4 ^G:A.T^ HOT *>vaC>WkI 






As the 1 980's arrived, the most pressing problem this country 
faced was economic upheaval. Inflation spiraled during the 
class of 'Si's years at Simmons. This was reflected in dramatic 
tuition increases. In 1977, the cost of tuition was $3808.00; this 
figure rose to $4,928.00 for the 1980-81 school year. All other 
fees and room and board also increased, but financial aid to 
students helped to combat these costs. 

The Simmons community was composed of a diverse group of 
young women who had individual interests and needs. New 
organizations and programs sprung up due to student impetus to 
offer Simmons women an outlet for expression and growth. 

The Black Student Organization changed its name in the 
1979-80 academic year to the Black-Hispanic Organization, 
whose purpose was to "promote interest and pride in the aspira- 
tions and accomplishments of black and Hispanic people." The 
Organization actively participated in Simmons College activities 
and sponsored many social, educational, and political events 
throughout the year within the College and in the metropolitan 
area. 



'■^^;^^^__ 



Simmons for Survival was created in 1 978 in response to the 
growing need for information on issues that threaten mankind's 
survival in a nuclear age. Eventually its purpose evolved to 
include discussions about a wide range of political issues. 

The Women's Center provided a supportive atmosphere for 
women to become more aware of themselves and the forces 
which influenced their lives. The Center sponsored various ac- 
tivities such as Women's Month, and housed a small library and 
magazine collection on women's topics. 

The Human Sexuality Program Committee sponsored pro- 
grams, speakers, and films to dispense information to the Sim- 
mons community about all aspects of human sexuality. 

The Dance Collective provided weekly exercise and dance 
courses to students who wanted to continue their dance training 
or to learn basic dance principles. 

The Computer Club was formed for members of the Simmons 
community who were interested in computer technology. The 
club sponsored speakers from computer-related fields and held a 
career night. 







The class of 1981 was greatly affected by political changes in this state and 
throughout the country. Much controversy surrounded Governor Edward King's 
decision to raise the legal drinking age to twenty in 1979. Many Simmons women 
signed the Covenant, a document supported by hundreds of thousands of Boston-area 
people to show their concern and pledge their help for a city torn apart by racial strife. 

Simmons women became quite concerned when President Carter proposed the 
reenactment of the draft, including women, in 1980, since the Equal Rights Amend- 
ment had yet to be approved and added to the Constitution. Ronald Reagan, sup- 
ported by the Moral Majority and a massive swing to the right politically throughout 
the country, won what was probably the first presidential election most of the class of 
1981 ever voted in. 

The major issue that defeated jimmy Carter in 1980 was, of course, the way he 
handled the economy. There were, however, multitudes of other issues and problems 
that he could not seem to solve. During the Carter administration the United States 
faced the gas crunch caused by Arab oil embargoes, the Three Mile Island catas- 
trophe, followed by many nuclear plant protests throughout the country. People 
complained about illegal immigrants from Mexico. U.S. generals denounced the 
SALT II treaty, women lobbied for legalized abortion, the government established 
diplmatic relations with China and broke its treaty with Taiwan. The Soviets invaded 
Afghanistan, so the United States and many other countries boycotted the Moscow 
Olympics. The government relinquished control of the Panama Canal. 






Begin and Sadat nnade some progress toward resolving the 
Middle East crisis during the Camp David talks, but eventually 
lost their momentum. Finally, and probably most signigicantly, 
Iran terrorists seized fifty American hostages, including the 
father of Simmons student Alyssa Keough, in an effort to coerce 
this country to return the exiled Shah and the wealth they 
claimed he had stolen from their country. 






10 






The class of 1981 saw the election of two popes after the death 
of Pope Paul VI: Pope John Paul I, and following his death, Pope 
John Paul II. Many Simmons women will remember waiting in 
the pouring rain on Boston Common in November of 1979 to 
catch a glimpse of Pope John Paul II when he visited the United 
States. Religion made the news during those four years at Sim- 
mons in more sinister ways, too. People were horrified by the 
senseless mass suicide of the members of the People's Temple 
headed by Jim Jones in Guyana. Cults, despite the bad press, 
gained in popularity. Sects like The Way, the Unification 
Church, and others were accused of brainwashing their mem- 
bers. 



11 










12 




The class of 1981 witnessed many fads and 
startling events while at Simmons. The first test 
tube baby was born in England. Toxic shock 
syndrome, a disease associated with the use of 
tampons, was exposed, and Procter & Gamble 
was forced to withdraw Rely tampons from the 
market. Disco went out, the New Wave rolled 
in. Rollerskating at Spinoff, raquetball, tanning 
booths, hot tubs, small cars, computer games, 
video disks, the "preppie" look, Calvin Klein 
jeans, palimony. Bo Derek, 60 Minutes, and 
Proposition Vh were in. Miss Lillian, Billy, 
and Jimmy Carter were out, along with the 
U.S. dollar, the "Annie Hall" look, DC-10's, 
homemakers, and investing in silver. And 
finally, after many bets and much agonized 
waiting, the world found out that Kristin shot 
J.R. 

By the time the class of '81 had reached 
graduation, with diplomas in hand, they had 
achieved many of their goals set four years 
earlier, and now were ready to take on new 
responsibilities, new roles, and new dreams. 
The uncertainty they felt reminded them of the 
women they were at Orientation, but this time 
they were less unsure about how they would 
change than about how they would change 
their world. 





13 






14 






15 





16 



Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 



Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 



Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 



Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 



Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 
Seniors 



17 






l/%. 



Melody Adam 



Janice Abercrombie 






Misgana Amelga 



Dana Albert 



Sandra Adier 



18 







Laura Anderson 




Deborah Andrews 





Maia Aparo 



Deborah Ayvazian 




Ana Valle-Bachrach 



19 





Beryl Bailey 


^^^^^^^^^^^K. * *iga^ ,:dflK^^^^^^^^^I 


^^^^^^^^^^P^'a^RVb^ ^^^Ik^^B^^^I 


Cii^flH 


^^m Viv^P^^^HP^F^ "^ ^^^^^^^^^2bJ| 






Nancy Baird 




Jodie Barnett 



Beth Banks 



Pamela Barnard 



20 




Karen Barry 





Desiree Baynes 



Christine Belsky 





Heidi Bennett 



Dina Benou 



21 





Theresa Bergen 



Lisa Bernier 





Janie Bernstein 



Nancy Betts 




22 



T Ji% 


^ 


^ ^jM W 


Hi 


^^^■^^^'' "^"MNP 


k. 


^^^. ^ '^ Mk 


■V 


md 


1 




Sarah Blanchard 



Kathy Boucher 






Barbara Bowen 



Esther Brown 



Jane Burgarella 



23 




Carol Butler 





Jane Buyers 




Susan Calaman 




-T^- 



Marilyn Cantor 



Cathleen Cain 



24 





Ellen Carmody 



Jennie Cardoza 





Lucille Cartelli 



Valerie Carter 




Ginny Catalfamo 



25 




Carolyn Cavanaugh 





Therese Champion 





Andrea Christian 



Emily Chin 



Stephanie Chernyshou 



26 




Marisol Christy 




ki ^j~ 



B.M. Clarke 




Elizabeth Cleaves 




Carolyn Close 




Susan Coan 



27 



Leslie Colonero 





Linda Colangelo 



Jane Cohen 





Josephine Conte 



Barbara Condon 



28 




Laurie Copeland 




Karen Coppa 




Gail Corrente 




Maureen Costello 




Patricia Costello 



29 





Janine Coveney 





Mary Ann Crayton 




Cindy Cuadra 



Patricia Creighton 



Janice Young-Cross 



30 




Marilyn Cugini 





Ramona Cullen 



Jacqueline Daly 





Mary Louise D'Andrea 



Carol Davin 



31 





Kathryn Dawson 



Wendell Dennis 




\ 





Barbara DePass 



Nancy Ann Depew 



Barbara Devecis 



32 





Lisa DeVincenzo 



Maribeth Devries 





r^ 


S^ ^^" 


1^^^^^^ !SR 

^^^^^^B 


m^ 


^HH^ 





Susan DiFronzo 



Nneka Dike 



Diane Dobrowski 



33 







Anne Doherty 




Eileen Doyle 






Pandora Dumas 



Anne-Marie Duffy 



Sophie Drescher 



34 





Kathleen Dziewisz 



Nancy Edmonds 





Diane Efstratiou 



Mary Ann Edson 




Barbara Elias 



35 




Wendy Ellison 





Ellen Eluto 





Kristin Fernald 



Elizabeth Ferber 



Martha Eshoo 



36 





Lourdes Fernandez 



Julie Fernie 





Janice Fish 



Rebecca Fishbein 




Sally Fogel 



37 




-m. 



^ I 




Judi Frankel 



Robin Francis 






Lynne French 



Tia Freeman 



Susan Freedman 



38 




Nancy Fuller 




Angelica Gamilis 




Joanne Gamilis 




Nancy Gardner 




*■* -* 



\ 



Catherine Geanoulis 



39 





Marylou Gendron 





Mary Gillis 



F 


^^mj 


J^^k 


L 


ij 


^B TT 


"^ \ ^fl 


r 


r 


^A 


'^ 


^ 








1 



Lee Guilfoyle 



•X^---'/^' 



Naomi Griffith 



Elizabeth Grundy 



40 




4^ 



Mary Haley 




Lisa Hamlin 




Laurie Hamblet 





Lisa Harris 



Carole Hawk 



41 





Christine Hays 



Margaret Hazerjian 






Beverly Heller 



Micheie Hersch 



Jean Hetzel 



42 





^^ 



Noreen Higgins 



Cynthia Hill 






Michelle Hoberman 



Nancy Hooper 



Nancy Hyde 



43 





^ 


■a!,; 


^^ 


% 




^L c- 

^^^^^^^^■L 


J 








L 




Carol James 




Cynthia Jessel 




Rhonda Johnson 




Vula Kalambokis 



Annette Johnson 



44 





Jessica Kenn 



Charlene Kennedy 




' / 'l 



Jacqueline Kidd 




Marjaneh Keramaty 




/ 






Nita Kim 



45 




4 



Lisa King 





Margaret Kirkpatric 





Gail Konchagulian 



Dawn Klinker 



46 




Paula Kotsopoulos 




Nanci Krasker 





Jennifer Krusen 



Cynthia Laiacona 




Linda Lamontagne 



47 





Pamela Langevin 



Claire Landesmann 





Nr^ 




Brenda Lazare 



Margaret Newton-Lassanah 



Sharlene Larson 



48 




Patricia Leahy 




Monique Legros 




mii'^Ta 



Nina Leon 





Julie Lightbourn 



49 




Diane Lindemann 





Maureen Linnane 




Mary Macri 



> ( 



Jayne Lipman 



Susan Luchetti 



50 




Anat Madanes 




Mary Malloy 




Anuradha Mahindra 





Cheryl Mancuso 



Lara Margoshes 



51 





Lisa Marocco 



Brenda Maxwell 






Barbara Mazzi 



Nicole McCabe 



Sheila McCabe 



52 





Elizabeth Mclnerney 



Teresa McKeon 






Laurie McLaughlin 



Susan McLaughlin 



Kathryn McNiel 



53 




Susan McPherson 





Donna Medieros 




Melinda Metcalf 




Cheryl Miller 



Amy Mendelson 



54 





Cynthia Miller 



Katina Morakis 




Valerie Mroz 




Mary Moro 




Kathleen Mullane 



55 



\ 




Catherine Murphy 





Colleen Murphy 





I 



Caria Nazzaro 



Jeanne Naulty 



Mary Foss Murphy 



56 





4* 




Marie Nichols 



Victoria Nicholas 



Carolyn Nelson 




Brenda Nightingale 




Christine Niswander 



57 








Cassandra October 



Nancy O'Brien 






Jean Olsson 



Charmaine Oliver 



Joanne O'Keeffe 



58 




Katherine Orcutt 




Sharon Orel 




k. 



Paula Oteri 




Carol Palasek 




Michelle Papazian 



59 




Jill Parnett 





Susan Peecher 




Donna Pickett 



Maria Pennachio 



Kimberly Phillips 



60 




JL 





Suzanne Piecuch 




Ruth Podlenski 



Hillery Plotkin 





Linda Porada 



Nancy Porcello 



61 





Cynthia Proctor 



Tracy Proctor 





i 




Barbara Puis 



Ellen Quan 



Kimberly Quinlan 



62 




i 


w 

i. 

i 


H^^ -^iv^^H 






^fc^t ^iLjfc^* .^Hu^^r 






^_' _ ^K^m 






m *"''~~^ ^F 


-r' 


.^ 


^iM^k ■;|#'f ^^^^^^^^ 


gf 




C&fl|^^ ^^^^^^^^^B 


'SOBrnr-- 


^% ^^H 




^ ^^H 


M 




%4Mlft hI^^^^^^^^^^^^I 


\"z?. 


^^^1 



Susan Rao 



Carolyn Rea 






Anne Reynolds 



Denise Richardson 



Karen Richter 



63 





Elaine Robinson 



Karen Roberts 



64 




Wanda Robinson 




Christine Rockwell 



!» 


^^^^^^^^Hj^^^^ 1 J^ s,.. 


1 




M 


■L ^ '^ ^^K^ 


m 


M^^ f^m 


^M 


I ^fc 


m 


Bfl^^ .^I^H 




Joanne Rosengard 



Paige Rosenblatt 




Gilda Rossi 



65 




Eva Rugayo 





IK 



Jolee Russas 





Donna Sapsowitz 



Jennie Santillo 



Laurie Ruttenberg 



66 




Ellyn Sartucci 



A 


^^^ 






M| 


m 


A 


}r'/ 








k 

-•'. 



Susan Schenck 





Ann Schnaper 



Alicia Scott 




Fern Selesnick 



67 





Susan Shapiro 



Ellen Settimel 






Jamie Shevell 



Kathleen Sheehan 



Christine Shea 



68 




Deborah Sibilio 




Gladys Sierra 




Kathryn Siliski 




Kathleen Simard 




Deborah Slason 



69 





Heather Smith 



Barbara Smith 






Mary Snow 



Janet Smith 



Kathleen Smyth 



70 




Eda Sonis 




Jennifer Spackman 




^ 



Susan Souris 





Donna Speaks 



Nancy Spelbrink 



71 





Suann Spellman 



Ellen Spiegel 






Heather Stewart 



Laura Stewart 



Sheila Sullivan 



72 





Holly Sutherland 



Karen Swan 






{ 



Caria Swanson 



Heidi Tammik 



Donna Thompson 



73 




Rosa To 





P. Sarah Tucker 




Donna Turner 




Tricia Tyler 



Cynthia Tulloch 



74 




Deborah Upton 




Mary Ann Vaccaro 




Pauline Venzen 




Jacqueline Vantol 




Marianne Vozeolas 



75 




Susan Wadman 





Marie Wagner 





Lorraine Warner 



Marguerite Walmsley 



Elisa Wajtusik 



76 




) 



Jessica Wasseth 





■N. 



4^ 



Marvia Watt 




Susan Webb 



Elise Weis 




Judith Weiss 



11 





Amy White 



Michelle Wells 






Luanne Williams 



Cynthia Williams 



Susanna Whitman 



78 




Karen Winthrop 




Dianne Wong 




Irene Wong 




Regina Wood 




Valerie Worle 



79 




Catherine Yee 




Patricia Yuu 





Elaine Zouzas 



Marci Ziff 



80 






81 






82 






\.^ 



JL 





83 






84 








85 







86 



Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 



Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 



Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 



Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 



Depan 


tments 


Depan 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 


Deparl 


tments 



Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 



Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 



Departments 



Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 
Departments 



Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 
Departme 



87 



Basic Drawing 
Studio Art Drawing 

Painting 

Silk Screen Painting 

Intaglio Printmaking 

roduction to Art History 



Art in the United States 



Art in Europe 

Perspectives in Music 

ical Theory and Practice 



Aesthetics of Folk Music 



Musical Drama 



Department of Art 
and Music 




Left to right: Robert Henry Oppenheim (Acting Chairman), Robert E. Gronquist, Alicia Faxon, 
Dana C. Chandler. Missing: Thomas J. Wallace. 



The Department of Art and Music 
has recently experienced several 
changes. In 1979, a full-time art 
historian was hired, enabling the 
Department to expand curricular 
offerings in the field of art history. 
Additions to studio facilities include 
drawing benches, drawing tables, a 
model's stand, and upgraded 
audio-visual equipment. The 
Department looks forward to the 
completion of renovations on the 
fourth floor of the Main College 
Building, renovations which will 
include an exhibition and 



performance area, faculty and staff 
offices, a new slide library, 
workrooms, and a rehearsal area. 
Acting Chairman Robert Henry 
Oppenheim says, "The range of 
course offerings remains the same, 
although we look forward to the 
new facilities providing opportunity 
for program enrichment. Students 
enrolled in art and music courses 
come from a variety of disciplines; 
our instructors are committed to 
increasing students' visual and 
auditory awareness and skills." 



88 



Department of 
Biology 




Sitting: Martha D. Berliner,Bruce P. Hettick, Rachel C. Si<virsky, Karen Loehr. Second row: 
Richard P. Nickerson, Louis B. Irwin, N. Sandra Williams (Chairman). Not shown: Everett Leroy 
Tuttle, Elizabeth Guth, Paul Martindale, Mary MacCurtain, Elizabeth Roche. 



"The goal of the Biology 
Department is to give students a 
basic knowledge of chemistry, 
biology, and math; and, at the same 
time, to stimulate their creative 
abilities. We don't want to make 
them just carriers of knowledge but 
also users of knowledge, since that 
interaction is important," says N. 
Sandra Williams, Chairman of the 
Department of Biology. 

"We want students to know and 
understand how to do things," she 
explains. "We don't want them to 
research and experiment just for 
the experience, but in order to 
understand how to do it. The end 
result is not as important as their 
way of thinking." 

During the past four years, the 
Department of Biology has further 
developed its Biology Enrichment 
Program, an extra-curricular 



enrichment program which allows 
students to apply classroom 
knowledge to real world situations. 
Students begin this program during 
their freshman and sophomore 
years. They donate one hour a week 
to work with a faculty member in 
research. During their junior and 
senior years, they become paid 
assistants in the department, 
assuming roles as either teaching 
assistants, lab assistants, or prep 
room assistants. The positions often 
lead to summer employment in the 
department. 

Williams believes that students 
have affected the Department 
because they have a natural 
curiosity about everything. "Students 
are constantly asking questions and 
that's very good. There are good 
reasons for the question 'why?' and 
that helps us to change." 



General Biology 
Biology of Plants 
Invertebrate Zoology 
Comparative Animal Phy 
Plant Physiology 
Cell Biology 
Genetics 
Principles of Ecology 



Evolution 



Immunobiology 
Topics in Marine Biology 
Advanced Experimental I 
Topics in Behavioral Bioh 
Microtechnique 



89 



Department of 
Chemistry 





Peter G. Bowers 
Chairman 



Missing: Iclal S. Hartman, Mary 
Hoult, Marcia Kirssin, Harold 
McKone, Carl Mehrbach, James 
Underhill Piper, Carolyn C. Spodick. 



The Department of Chemistry 
offers a wide variety of educational 
opportunities to serve Simmons 
students' equally diverse interests in 
the fields of science, health, and 
computer technology, as well as 
current environmental and social 
issues. Since the fall of 1977, there 
have been many additions to the 
academic program and greater 
interaction between the faculty and 
students. 

The five and one-half year Double 
Degree Program in Chemistry and 
Pharmacy, in which the student 
graduates with one degree from 
Simmons and one from 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy 
(MCP), has included at least six 
students per year since its inception. 
This program has also allowed MCP 
students to take 100 credit hours in 



Phyllis A. Brauner 




Jerry Alan Bell 



advanced chemistry courses here at 
Simmons. 

Out of its concern to do more for 
all students in providing material 
and experiences appropriate to 
contemporary concerns in 
chemistry, the Department has 
added computer-guided laboratory 
experiments, a survival Chemistry 
course, and a joint 
Chemistry-Management 
concentration. 

Faculty and students have had 
impressive individual and combined 
involvement in chemistry research. 
Out of thirty-five papers appearing 
in science publications or read at 
national meetings recently, sixteen 
have been co-authored by Simmons 
students involved in independent 
study projects. 

Members of the Chemistry faculty 




Leonard J. Stoltzberg 




Mae Lucille Beck 

have been active outside of 
Simmons. Dr. Mae L. Beck visited 
Antarctica; Dr. Phyllis A. Brauner 
and Mrs. Carolyn G. Spodnick visited 
the People's Republic of China; Dr. 
jerry A. Bell spent his leave of 
absence at Brandeis; and Dr. James 
U. Piper, at the Worcester 
Foundation of Experimental Biology. 
Dr. leal S. Hartman studied the 
medicinal purposes of herbs, and 
Dr. Leonard J. Soltzberg continued 
his extensive works with computers 
at Simmons. 

Of nineteen graduates in the past 
three years, eight entered graduate 
school, eight immediately began 
working in chemistry-related careers, 
one went to medical school, another 
to dental school, and one became a 
teacher. 



Department of 
Communications 





Lynda A. Beltz (Chairman) 



Robert Francis White 

Missing: Virginia Louise Bratton, Reginald Jackson, Deborah 
Smiley, Margaret Matheny Bailey, Homer jenks, Stacy Greenspan, 
Gail Harris, William Patton, Alden Wood, Margaret A, Loeb. 




Charles Herbert Bali, Alden Poole (Director of Placement) 



The Department of 
Communications has grown to be 
the second largest department at 
Simmons College. "Communications 
is an exciting and different kind of 
major mainly because the field is 
always changing," said Lynda Beltz, 
Department Chairman. 

"Computerization has affected 
every aspect of communications," 
said Beltz. As a reflection of these 
changes the department recently 
acquired a Mergentaler CRTronic 
computerized typesetting system. 
Deborah Smiley, whose specialty is 
computer graphics, joined the 



Simmons Communications faculty 
in 1978. 

Professor Alden Poole is Director 
of Placement in the Department. He 
works in conjunction with the 
college's placement office to provide 
supplementary job information to 
Communications students. Why has 
the placement position been 
developed this year? 

"Future placement is an important 
concern because the job market has 
gone from tough to very tough," 
said Poole. To accomodate the 
placement needs of Communications 



students, Poole has developed job 
clinics, a job file, a job bulletin 
board, and a job telephone line. He 
also has individual counseling on 
resume writing and portfolio design 
available. 

Another recent acquisition to the 
Department of Communications is 
an eleven-station darkroom on the 
first floor of the library building. The 
department also has access to a new 
video studio and equipment. 

As for the future, the Department 

plans to offer a master's program 

very soon. 

91 



Microeconomics 



Department of 
Economics 



Macroeconomics 
Matliematical Economics 



Econometrics 



toryof Economic Thougiit 
Money and Banidng 



Public Finance 



"conomic Analysis of Law 
Industrial Organization 
Mangerial Economics 
Urban Economics 
Regional Economics 




Left to right: James B. Bryan, Barbara Ann Sawtelle (Chairman), Donald Basch. Missing: Gautam 
Chatterjee, Harriet Tolpin, Stephen Holden. 



Rapid growth in the number of 
Economics concentrators and in the 
number of students enrolling each 
term in the "Introductory Principles" 
courses indicate that economics i' a 
growing concern of Simmons 
students. National and world 
economics have become more 
complicated, and students are 
increasingly aware of these 
complications. 

Several new courses and new 
professors in the Department reflect 
the rapid expansion in departmental 
enrollments and the Department's 
increased emphasis on applied 
economics. Beyond providing 



theoretical and quantitative courses 
required for the Economics 
concentration, the Department offers 
a variety of electives, many of which 
are complements to other 
concentrations and programs within 
the College. Among current electives 
are: "Economic Analysis of Law," 
"Government Regulation of Industry," 
"Economics of Health Care," and 
"The New International Economic 
Order." These courses particularly 
focus on public policy concerns and 
highlight the new and challenging 
interdisciplinary applications of 
economic analysis. 



92 



Department of 
Education 




Sitting: Helen Guttentag, Shelia Newsome, Alice Van Deusen, Kathleen Dunn Lyman, Lydia 
Averell Hurd Smith, Kathleen Chiasson (Secretary), Debra Mesch. Standing: Carol Smith (Liason), 
Marvin Lew, B. J. Lates. Not shown: Joan Pine (Chairman), John Stuart Robinson (Dean of 
Graduate Studies and Social Sciences), Georgia Theophillis Noble, Elizabeth Rawlins, Judith 
Hummel Fischer,Bard Rogers Hamlen, Ophelia Howe, Frances Maher, Maria Marolda, Matilda 
Mitsakos, James E. McCormack, Jr., Harvi Stander, Natalie Warshawer, Joseph F. 
Collins,Carolynn C. Hamlet. 



In compliance with the 
Massachusetts certification 
requirements, complete revision of 
the undergraduate program in the 
Department of Education is currently 
underway. The new regulations will 
become effective in 1982. Under the 
Mainstream Teacher Program, 
prospective teachers are trained to 
work with special needs students 
who have been mainstreamed into 
regular classes. As a result of the 
revised curriculum, chairwoman 
Kathleen Dunn Lyman says that the 
department is "phasing out its 
special needs program." 



Education students complement 
their classroom experience by 
teaching at a school for one 
semester. To further meet the 
requirements of the program, their 
lesson plans must include a way to 
help below-grade level students 
reach grade level. Student teaching 
can be done at the early childhood, 
elementary, middle school (grades 
five through nine), and secondary 
levels. However, students who wish 
to teach at the secondary level must 
also take courses in the subject 
matter to be taught. 



Human Services 

A human service worker is an 
educator, a counselor, an organizer, 
an advocate, an advisor, and a 
friend. The Simmons College 
Human Services Program began in 
1975 within the Department of 
Education and is one of the few 
such programs in the country 
offering a Bachelor's Degree. 
Enrollment has steadily increased 
over the past five years from two to 
twenty-six concentrators. 

While Human Services as a 
concentration is relatively new at 
Simmons, the philosophy behind the 
program has far-reaching roots. At 
one time, Simmons had a consumer 
economics and a child advocacy 
program of which the emphasis and 
focus had been on children and 
family. These earlier programs 
developed into Nutrition and 
Human Services, respectively. 

Reflecting on the fourteen years 
she has been at Simmons and 
watching the program develop, 
Elizabeth Rawlins, Associate 
Professor in Education, explains that 
this move was spurred by a growing 
awareness within the department 
that some students' interests in 
children and families were not being 
satisfied through teaching. She 
further explains that the Admissions 
Committee was struck by the 
number of incoming students who 
had extensive volunteer experience 
in community services. 

An Advisory Committee to the 
Human Services program is 
composed of faculty and students 
who are particularly interested in the 
direction of the program. During the 
1979-80 academic year, a Human 
Services pamphlet was published, 
and the "Lend A Hand" logo was 
adapted from the Dorchester Mental 
Health House — two outgrowths of 
student input. 

The past four years saw the 
establishment of the Sociology and 
Human Services interdepartmental 
concentration, the Mini-Spring 
Conference in 1978, and the 
positive recognition of the program 
by local agencies assuring its 
continuation and employment 
opportunities for students. Changes 
within the program occur in 
response to what is needed in the 
field and in society at large. 93 



Shakespeare 

The Bible 

James Joyce 

Creative Writing 

Aodern American Writers 

ns in Romantic Literature 

Compostition Worlcshop 

Blacl< Fiction in America 

Critical Responses 

Greek Mythology 

srworks of English Fiction 

ictorian Poetry and Prose 

Chaucer and His England 

Classic American Writers 

"he Dramatic Imagination 



Department of 
English 




David Scott Perry, Kimberly McChesney, Judith Wittenberg, John Douglas Perry, Lawrence Lee 
Langer, Charles Edmund L'Homme (Chairman), David George Gullette, Richard Clark Sterne, 
George Wilson Nitchie, Corinne Hirsch, Robert Henry Grant. Not shown: William J. Holmes, 
Floyd Barrington Barbour, William Michael Manly, Pamela Starr Bromberg, Wylie Sypher, 
Shirley Katz Davis, Mary Joan Demaso, Hedda Kopf. 



The Department of English is 
making a comeback. 

"During the past four years there 
have been noticeably more English 
majors. This is due to the increasing 
number of double concentrators," 
says Charles L'Homme, Department 
Chairman. 

In an effort to improve Simmons 
students' writing, the Department 
will change the freshman program 
starting September 1981. Added to 
the original freshman 101 and 103 
courses will be ENG 102, a one 
year course with the option of 
exempting after one semester. ENG 
102 will serve as a bridge between 
the other two courses. 



The Department will also be 
restructuring the program for English 
majors next fall. Students will be 
offered either a writing or literature 
option. "The option will give the 
English student a more definite idea 
of what she can do within the field,' 
says L'Homme. 

Another major change the 
Department has experienced within 
the past four years is the renovation 
of its offices in the main college 
building through the PRIDE I 
campaign. "I'm very pleased to have 
a gathering of the humanities 
departments on the same floor,,' 
L'Homme says. "Our new offices 
are a godsend." 



94 



Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures 




Seated, left to right: Mary Jane Treacy, Aida Belansky, Maria P. Staulo, Martha Gail Krow-Lucal 
Standing: Nancy Abraham Hall, Raquel Halty Ferguson (Chairman), Louise Gail Cohen, liana 
Livini, Don Hayes McKeen, Fritz Fleishchmann. Missing: Isabel Camara-Freiberger, Soheila 
Family, Nadine Harris, Wayne Ishikawa, Susan Mary Keane, James L.V. Newman, Helen 
Mamikonian, Anna Wegel. 



Learning a language other than 
one's own is an important academic 
aspect for each Simmons student. 
Students may elect courses in a 
foreign language and literature as 
part of her liberal education or she 
may select foreign language as her 
field of concentration with some 
career objective in mind. 

Raquel Halty Ferguson, Chairman 
of the Department, says many things 
help strengthen programs, and one of 
these things is the variety of student 
response. "There are students who 
really enjoy language, and there are 
some students who wish they never 



had to take a language." 

Several activities have been 
instituted by the Department within 
the past four years. Three years ago 
the Spanish Liaison was revived; last 
year a lecture series began through 
funds from the president's office. 
The Department sponsors 
International Night, Career Night, 
and weekly lunch tables. The lunch 
tables were initiated by the faculty 
so that students could go to the Fens 
on a given day, sit at the German, 
Spanish, or French table in order to 
eat lunch and speak the language. 



Major French Writers 
French Civilization 
French Cultural Myths anc 
Elementary German 
Intermediate German 



Russian Civilization 



Elementary Russian 
Spoken Spanish 
Spanish Civilization 
Intro to Literature of Spai 
Latin American Writers 



Hispanic-American Cuitu 



95 



The U.S. Federal System 
/ Modern Political Theory 
ig the Last Two Centuries 



Politics of Education 



Women and the Law 
Racism and Reform 
I and Underdevelopment 
International Relations 
nternational Organization 
Comparative Politics 
Soviet Politics 



Public Administration 



Department of 
Government 




Left to right: Deborah Miner, Carroll French Miles (Chairman). Missing: Cynthia Hamilton. 



"Because more students are taking 
government courses as electives, 
there's been an increased enrollment 
in the Department of Government," 
said Chairman Carroll Miles. 

"There's been an increased 
interest and concern in international 
relations. Simmons students have 
more concern for other parts of the 
v^orld. I suppose it has a lot to do 
with Mrs. Miner," said Miles. 
Professor Deborah Miner, whose 
specialty is international 
government, joined the Simmons 
Government Department four years 



ago. 

Government students have 
become involved in a model United 
Nations assembly held each spring 
outside New York City. The 
simulation is a competition between 
colleges on the eastern coast; each 
participating college represents a 
different country. 

According to Miles, the 
Government Liason is stronger and 
plays a more important role today. 
"The professors are able to consult 
more with the students," said Miles. 



96 



Health Sciences 




P.T. seniors and Instructor Jane Faraday; second row, far right. Secretary Linda Smith, second 
from right, second row. 



Department of Physical Therapy 



Physical therapy is a health 
science and service which uses 
physical techniques to help ill or 
disabled individuals regain health 
and achieve independence in 
physical activities. The program in 
physical therapy at Simmons 
provides the students with the 
resources and opportunities to 
develop professional competency 
based on a background in the 
social, biological and physical 
sciences as well as the humanities. 

The program originated at the 
Harvard Medical School and 
Children's Hospital Medical Center. 
It has since expanded to 
accommodate thirty-two students. 
This expansion was the direct result 
of increased need within the 
profession as well as increased 
student interest. Currently, students 
in the professional portion of the 
program attend classes on the 
Simmons campus, at the Children's 
Hospital Medical Center and the 
Harvard Medical School. Clinical 
affiliations have expanded to include 



a variety of clinical settings in the 
Boston area as well as in greater 
New England.* 

Highlights within the program 
over the past few years include the 
annual tradition of the fall term 
Blood Drive sponsored by the 
Physical Therapy Liaison. The 
beginnings of a hopeful trend were 
initiated during the academic year 
1979-80 concerning recognizing 
physical therapy students at the 
all-college commencement 
ceremony in May, in addition to 
their own graduation at Wheelock 
aduitorium in December after 
completing the four-and-one-half 
year program. 

The most recent and substantive 
change for the PT program is the 
acquisition of more space at 
Simmons, providing the Department 
with the conveniece of their own 
office, secretary, and classes. 

* (Excerpt from the Simmons 
College Physical Therapy Program 
booklet, August 1979) 



Medical 
Technology 

The concentration in Medical 
Technology is a rigorous four-year 
and one-summer program leading to 
the baccalaureate degree and to the 
Diploma in Diagnostic Laboratory 
Science. Approved by the Council 
on Medical Education of the 
American Medical Association and 
the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists, the program originated 
ten years ago within the Department 
of Biology. Students are members of 
the department until they move to 
Lynn Hospital in their final year to 
work in the laboratories and to be 
taught by hospital staff. Lynn 
Hospital is highly mechanized, 
computerized, and technically 
contemporary. At Lynn Hospital, 
students work in real job situations, 
and therefore are required to know 
an enormous amount of material 
and grasp quantitative skills. 

Faculty/student interaction is 
especially intense in this program to 
compensate for students being away 
from Simmons during their stay at 
Lynn Hospital. The Medical 
Technology Program sponsors 
forums and teas where films, 
speakers, and alumnae of the 
program meet with the students. The 
structure of the program has resulted 
in a high degree of placements for 
its graduates. 



Chemistry 

Hematology 

Urinanalysis 

Immunohematology 

Kinesiology 



97 



Colonial Boston 



Dry of Western Civilization 
ghtenment to the Present 
American Historiography 

Greek History 
Roman History 
Medieval History 
aissance and Reformation 
The Great Depression 
orces in American History 
Through Novels and Film 



le Recent Past in America 



Department of 
History 




Left to right: Mark Ira Solomon, Laurie Crumpacker, Richard B. Lyman, Henry James Haiko 
(Acting Chairman), John Cleary Hunter. Missing: Evelyn Brooks Barnett. 



Courses in history can help 
prepare students for a number of 
careers such as teaching, archival 
research, law, and government. 
Courses taken individually provide 
insights into the contemporary world 
and into the persisting ways of man. 
This is true whether courses taken 
are leading to a concentration in the 
subject or are taken to enrich a 
general education. 

"Simmons students still aren't 
particulary interested in 
concentrating in history," says 
Henry James HaIko, Acting 



Chairman. "There just isn't a large 
student interest here. We have had 
to remain open to students' interests; 
when the students' interests shift, we 
have to shift with them." An 
example of this can be seen by the 
creation of a course entitled 
"Colonial Boston" in response to 
student interest in the Bicentennial. 
"History of the Family" is yet 
another course created in this 
fashion. These and other history 
courses are enriched with trips to 
museums and places of historical 
interest, and movie showings. 



98 



Department of 
Management 




Left to right: John Pfaff (Chairman), Marilyn Mackey, Andrew I. Masiuk, Leo Parente. Missing 
Woodrow W. Baldwin, Katherine Mary Bevacqua, Laurence M. Onie, Bruce W. Warren. 



Managerial Accounting 

Dynamics of Managemei| 

Business and Its Environi 

Communications in Man< 

Tcixation 

Auditing 

Exploring the Retail Envii 

Marketing 



More women than ever before 
were pursuing careers in 
management in 1981, which was 
reflected at Simmons in that 
Management was the most popular 
concentration of all offered. Since 
1977, the Department of 
Management has made substantial 
changes in some of its programs. 

The course in business 
communication, for example, was 
considered to be so important that 
the Department decided to make it a 
graduate requirement in 1982. In 
1980 courses were added to the 
finance program. Accounting majors 
who qualified for Certified Public 
Accountant (CPA) licensing could 
now take the exam at Simmons. 
Several courses were also added to 
the accounting program, including 
two intermediate and one advanced 
course. 



Prince Program in 
Retailing 





Left to right: Milton L. Shuch (Director), Norma Rusbar. 



99 



Introductory Statistics 

Calculus 
Linear Algebra 
Alegebraic Structures 
Differential Equations 
Dduction to Real Analysis 
Topics in Geometry 
Probability Theory 



Mathematical Statistics 



Complex Variables 
Elementary Topology 



Numerical Methods 



Fortran IV Programming 
Systems Programming 



Statistics in Research 



Department of 
Mathematics 




Margaret Schoenberg Menzin, John D. Garberson (with Kate), Robert N. Goldman, Lynnell Stern, 
W. David Novak. Not shown: David S. Browder (Chairman). 



The growth of the Department of 
Mathematics at Simmons over the 
past four years is indicative of a 
national awareness of the 
importance of mathematics in our 
complex society. Simmons students' 
increased interest in statistics and 
computers demonstrates this 
progressive trend in mathematics. In 
1978, the Double Degree Program 
in Engineering with Dartmouth 
College was established. A student 
who completes the five-year 
program will earn a Bachelor of 
Science degree from Simmons and a 
Bachelor of Engineering from 
Dartmouth. Students spend their 
first, second, and fourth years at 
Simmons, and their third and fifth 
years at Dartmouth. The dual 
program provides a delightful 
contrast of city and country life, and 



combines an engineering and liberal 
arts program. 

The Cause Grant awarded in 1976 
provided computer-based materials 
in a variety of departments including 
mathematics, and students have the 
opportunity to choose computer- 
related areas for independent study 
in such areas as COBOL, PASCAL, 
and computer graphics. 

Faculty-student interaction extends 
beyond the classroom; each 
Wednesday faculty and students in 
the department meet at Bartol Hall 
for lunch — an eleven-year tradition. 
To aid students in post-graduate 
decisions, the Math Club sponsors 
an Annual Career Night which 
provides students an opportunity to 
meet with faculty, alumnae, and 
professionals in the field. 



100 



Department of 
Nursing 




Nursing of Families 
^ Nursing of Children and > 
Nursing in the Communii 
Introductory Chemistry: 1 
General Biology 
Microbiology 
Human Anatomy 



Sitting: Helen Fenstermacher, Denise M. Ross, Ann Elizabeth Lord, Alice Marie Hosack. Second 
row: Helen Chorak McLaughlin, Tish Thornley, Lois Estelle Schoppee, Elizabeth Howard, Martha 
J. Kleinernnan. Third row: Roberta Gantz, Maria N. Bueche, Nita Kim {graduate student), Susan 
Blankenship. Not shown: Phyllis Parnes Moore (Chairman), Alice Marie Hosack, Ann Elizabeth 
Lord, Mary Craig Billingsley, Celeste M. Hurley, Mary Jane O'Brien, Marilyn Pajk, Margaret B. 
Jernigan, Penelope M. Nichols, Richard Porter, Susan Wainger, Robert Banzett, Ann Morgan 
Fawcett, Margaret L. Harbison, Eileen Callahan Hodgman, Stephen H. Loring, Patricia McArdle, 
Victoria Vespe Ozonoff, Stephen L. Sneddon, Ann Y, Watson, Dieter Koch-Weser. 



"Because of the acute shortage of 
nurses during the past two years, 
Simmons nursing students can go 
practically anywhere and be 
guaranteed a job," says Phyllis 
Moore, Chairman of the Department 
of Nursing. 

Simmons' Department of Nursing, 
long noted for its excellent academic 
preparation, has continued to try to 
offer Simmons students the richest 
possible learning experiences. Four 
years ago the Department developed 
a successful graduate program in 
conjunction with the Brigham and 
Women's hospitals. Also beginning 
in 1977 was an ongoing Community 
Health Preceptorship, in which 



undergraduate students are assigned 
in pairs to a participating community 
health center in the greater Boston 
area. Two more clinical practice 
areas — Norwood and Beth Israel — 
recently joined the original twelve 
practice areas. 

The Department of Nursing 
moved from the fourth floor to the 
newly renovated second floor of the 
main college building in June 1979. 
Now the Department has a learning 
resource center which provides 
equipment and materials for students 
to use to practise and sharpen their 
nursing skills. The change, says 
Moore, is "like night and day." 



Physiology 
Introduction to Psycholoj 
Developmental Psycholo; 
Introduction to Sociologi 
Sociology of Health 
Economics of Health Car 
Childbearing 
Female Health 



101 



Food Science 



Sociological Implications 
gy of Food and Nutrition 



Human Nutrition 



ion Through the Lifespan 
)n in Metabolic Disorders 
rch Methods in Nutrition 
Clinical Dietetics 
Community of Nutrition 
:e Systems Management 
Consumer Education 
1 Dietetic Practice Theory 



Department of 
Nutrition 



• mi 




Left to right: Patricia Ann Kreutler (Chairperson), Katharine Mr. Bevacqua, Carole R. Dichter. 
Missing: Bridget A. Bowes, Nancie Herbold, Marion Mason, Terri L. Snnith. 



In August of 1977 the Department 
of Nutrition moved from the Main 
Campus Building to the third floor of 
the Park Science Center. "Besides 
the improved physical facilities, 
there's now a much closer interac- 
tion with the Math and Science De- 
partments," said Patricia Kreutler, 
Chairman of the Department. 

There has been a steady number 
of Nutrition majors during the past 
four years. Kreutler stated, however, 
that there is a recent shift in career 
interests away from therapeutic 
dietetics toward research. Many 
Nutrition students are double major- 
ing in Management, Education, 
and Chemistry. 

The Nutrition Liaison has become 



more active in the past four years. 
Many of the liaison's activities take 
place each March during National 
Nutrition Week. It was during this 
week a couple of years ago that 
"Nutra Bird," a costumed student, 
first made its appearance on 
campus. 

According to Kreutler, opportuni- 
ties for fieldwork and independent 
studies have expanded during the 
past four years. Individual members 
of the faculty have published nutri- 
tion textbooks which are used for 
courses within the department, and 
last year the Ruby Winslow Lynn 
scholarship was established for rising 
seniors. 



102 



Department of 
Philosophy 




Carol Ochs (Chairman), Brad Art, Susan Nicholson. Not shown: Ynhui Park. 



Philosophy may have either an 
analytic or ethical-value focus. The 
Department of Philosophy at 
Simmons has chosen and cultivated 
a special value focus. The 
Department has made conscious 
decisions to concentrate on ethics 
and religion. 

Considering the numerical growth 
of both faculty and students, these 
decisions seem to have been 
successful. The Department of 
Philosophy has grov^n from a 



two-member faculty, located in a 
tiny gray office, to three full-time 
and two part-time faculty members 
offering a variety of courses in all 
levels, located in the center of the 
main college building third floor. 
Thanks to the PRIDE renovations 
during the Class of Si's four-year 
Simmons experience, perhaps the 
humanities' central location is 
symbolic of a rejuvenation of the 
humanities and liberal arts at 
Simmons College. 



Problems of Philosophy 
Philosophy of Religion 
Modern Logic 



Ethics 



Philosophy of Art 
Oriental Philosophy 
Philosophy of Human Na| 
Philosophy of Mind 
History of Philosophy 



Existentialism 



Descartes to Kant 



Metaphysics 
Philosophy in Literature 
Philosophy Seminar: Plat( 
Philosophy of Science 



103 



"lectricity and Magnetism 
ics and Statistical Piiysics 
in the Physical Sciences 



Electronics 



Theory and Applications 
Advanced Mechanics 
^anced Electromagnetism 
\tical Methods of Physics 



Department of Physics 



troduction to Astronomy 

Introduction to Geology 

Fundamentals of Physics 

Nuclear Energy 

Waves and Optics 

Modern Physics 



Mechanics J 




Robert Carey Vernon, Edward Prenowitz (Chairman). 



Physic's fundamental principles 
apply to the physical universe, 
galaxies, subatomic microcosm, and 
chemical and biological systems. 
Physics provides an understanding of 
the phenomena of our physical 
environment and underlies the 
technology which increasingly forms 
our world. 

Professor Prenowitz's and 
Vernon's multiple abilities and 
flexibility provide students with a 
choice and variety of course 
selections. Despite its small size, the 



physics department offers a wide 
selection of courses at all levels, 
attracting students from many other 
fields. 

The two professgrs alternate the 
teaching of several courses by the 
Keller Plan, a self-paced academic 
program. 

Many interdepartmental 
concentrations are available through 
the Physics department, the most 
popular of which is a joint 
Math-Physics program. 



104 



Department of 
Psychology 




Left to right: Peter Watson Castle, Dane L. Harwood, Lillian M. Grayson, Teresa Sosa Carterette 
(Chairman), Barbara F. Gentile. Missing: Alice Axelrod, Diane T. Coulopoulos, Eugene Givens, 
Diane Schodlatz, Donald William Thomas. 



Over the past four years, the De- 
partment of Psychology has moved 
further in the direction of giving stu- 
dents more guidelines in choosing 
courses: a result of students going 
on to discover a very broad range of 
studies after graduation. Teresa Sosa 
Carterette, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment, says: "Today's students want 
to be something specific. Many con- 
tinue their psychology studies on a 
graduate level; some go into clinical 
psychology or law, or even manage- 
ment." 

Commenting on the Department's 
philosophy, Carterette continues, 
"We don't just focus on skills, but 
we try to emphasize that psychology 



is part of a broad general education. 
We want students to get a perspec- 
tive and another way of looking at 
electives, both clinically and 
academically." The psychology 
program correlates guidelines with 
what's happening in the world. For 
example, students have recently ex- 
pressed interest in and are finding 
placements in child advocacy. 

Carterette feels that the Depart- 
ment is doing a good job in working 
with individuals. "We try to do 'on- 
call' advising so students are com- 
fortable in making appointments 
with us and seeing us," she con- 
cludes. 



Introduction to Psycholo; 
The Female Experience: \ 



Introduction to Personali 



Physiological Psychology 
The Analysis of Behavior 
Developmental Psycholo 
Psychology of Adolescer 
The Nature of Abnormal 
Appetite 



Social and Emotional De\ 



Psychology of Motivatior 
Statistical Methods in Ps^ 



105 



Sociological Thought 
)logy: Its Foci and Scope 
Sociology of Education 
, Ethnicity and Minorities 
Sociology of Health 
Criminology 
Family and Society 
American Society 
Urban Sociology 
Complex Organizations 
ssical and Contemporary 
ch Methods in Sociology 



Department of 
Sociology 




Left to right: Caryl Goodman, Rachel Forman, Mary J. Osirim, Elaine C. Hagopian, Stephen D. 
London (Chairman). Missing: Joan Rachlin. 



The Department of Sociology has 
been expanding and revising its 
program in response to a growing 
student interest in the field. During 
the past four years, the Department 
has designed courses which examine 
society's views on women, health 
care, and criminology. The latest 
addition to the program is an ad- 
vanced course in sociological theory. 
The courses offered by the Depart- 
ment encourage both concentrators 
and non-concentrators to study 



sociology as it relates to their field of 
interest. To meet the academic 
needs of the students, two full-time 
professors and one part-time instruc- 
tor have been added to the Depart- 
ment's faculty since 1977. "The 
program has a new philosophy, new 
course offerings, and new require- 
ments which have attracted profes- 
sors and students who are commit- 
ted to excellence," according to 
Stephen D. London, Chairman. 



106 



Afro-American Studies 




Left to right: Elizabeth B. Rawlins, Floyd Barrington Barbour (Director), Marcia L. Holford. Missing: 
Dana C. Chandler, Robert Grant, Cynthia Hamilton, Reginald L. Jackson, Helen Boulware Moore, 
Mary J. Osirim, Mark Ira Solomon. 



The Black Experience in 
Race, Ethnicity and Minor] 
The Teaching of Afro-Am( 
Race and Society in SoutI 
African Roots of Americai 
Blacl< Fiction in America 
Modern American Blacl< 



Problems in the Contemi 



Art History from a Blacl< 




Richard Clark Sterne (Coordinator), Laurie Crumpacker. 



American Studies 

United States Colonial Hi| 
Race and Society 
Classic American Writers 
American Poetry 
The Dramatic Imaginatioi 
Introduction to American! 
i Art in the United States 
Public Administration 



107 



Women's Studies 




Bottom, left to right: Laurie Crumpacker (Coordinator), N. Sandra Williams, Martha Gail Krow-Lucal. Top: Richard B. Lyman, Pamela Starr 
Bromberg, Rachel Forman, Judith Wittenberg, Caryl Goodman, Mary J. Osirim. 



Issues in Women's Studies 



Women in Literature 



Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Western World 

Women and the Law 

The History of the Family 

Women in American History 

20th Century American Women 

History of Feminist Thought 



108 



Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 



Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 



Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 




Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 



Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 
Activities 



109 



Residence Halls 








Carol Leary, Director of Residence; Ann Steere, Manager of Residence. 





110 






Ill 




Mesick Hall 




112 



Morse Hall 



RTAD 




Simmons Hall 




113 



Smith Hall 




The M.I.T. Logatythms 




114 



Chorale 




Student Government 




115 






Senior 
Brunch 




116 



Physical Education 
and College Sports 




Left to right: Doris Emery Olmstead (Director), Anita E. Lorraine. Missing: Mary H, Staley, Sheila 
Brown (Coordinator of Inter-Collegiate Activities). 




One of the most vivid memories 
shared by the graduating class of 
1981 would be of how the 
Department of Physical Education 
changed during their four-year stay 
at Simmons. 

The size of the gymnasium, for 
example, was at least six times 
larger in their senior year than the 
room they used as a freshmen. The 
Universal, an advanced system for 
weight-lifting, was the biggest piece 
of equipment to be added to the 
Department and Inter-collegiate 
Sports Program since 1977. 
Although the physical education 
classes did not use the Universal as 
part of its program, all students. 



alumnae, and faculty could use the 
equipment whenever they wished. 
Those who used the Universal most 
tended to be members of the 
Simmons crew, sailing, tennis, 
volleyball, cross-country skiing, and 
field hockey varsity teams. All 
together these teams made up the 
Intercollegiate Sports Program. 

Through the generosity of the 
Simmons Alumae Association, 
equipment such as exercise bicycles, 
volleyball warm-ups, an ergometer, 
a van, oars, and a Four (a crew shell 
which seats four people), 
encouraged Simons students to be 
athletic enthusiasts as well as career 
women. 




117 




r^llMlilill al 'ill 





118 





Ti^KO" 









w 



m 





119 



SIMMONS 

FOR 

SURVIVAL 

Teach In 



Pleas for activism, worry over the effects 

of a Reagan presidency, and concern for 

the future happiness of all people. 






.Vk. 










120 






4 

FALL 
FEST 



Country music, city men, good 
food, and lotsa fun. 





i. 



121 



Asian Student Association 











Asian Student Association 
President Sally Ng cites increased 
attendance at meetings and 
improved communication as reasons 
for the A.S.A.'s success this year. 
The group started the first semester 
with a $90 budget and ended it with 
a balance of $505. They also 
sponsored The Asian Awareness 
Month Program which scheduled a 
variety of activities such as an 
exhibition for the Chinese New 
Year, a calligraphy demonstration, 
an Oriental fashion show, and an 
Oriental food sale. 




122 



Adrninis! 


tration 


Adm 


inisi 


tration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Adm 


inisi 


tration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Adm 


inisi 


tration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Adm 


inisi 


tration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Adm 


inisi 


tration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Admi 


nisi 


tration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Admi 


inisi 


:ration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Adm 


nisi 


:ration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Adm 


inisi 


:ration 


Adminisi 


tration 


Admi 


inisi 


iration 


Adminisi 


:ration 


Admi 


inisi 


iration 


Adminisi 


:ration 


Admi 


nist 


:ration 




Admi 
Admi 
Admi 
Admi 
Admi 
Admi 
Admi 
Admi 
Admi 
Admi 



nist 
nist 
nist 
nist 
nist 
nist 
nist 
nist 
nist 
nist 



ration 
ration 
ration 
ration 
ration 
ration 
ration 
ration 
ration 
ration 



Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 



stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 



Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 
Admin 



stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 
stration 



123 



President: 

1: an official chosen to 
preside over a meeting or 
assembly 2: an appointed 
governor of a subordinate 
political unit 3: the chief 
officer of an organization 
(as a corporation or institu- 
tion) usu. entrusted with the 
direction and administration 
of its policies 




Priscilla L. McKee 



•All definitions taken from Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1979, published by C. & C. 
Merriann Company, Springfield, Massachussetts. 



/ ' 



William J. Holmes, Jr. 




Administrative Vice President and 
Assistant to the President 

Vice President: 

1 : an officer next in rank to a president 
and usu. empowered to serve as presi- 
dent in that officer's absence or 
disability* 



124 




Dean: 



Charlotte Mae Morocco 



Associate Dean 



la: the head of the chapter of a 
collegiate or cathedral church . . . 
2a: the head of a division, faculty, 
college, or school of a university 
b: a college or secondary school 
administrator in charge of 
counseling and discipling stu- 
dents 




Marva Perry 



125 




Left to right: John Stuart Robinson, Anne E. Coghlan, Charles Ruyle Mackey. 

Dean of Social Sciences and 

Graduate Studies 

Dean of Sciences 
Dean of Humanities 



126 



Registrar 



an official recorder or l<eeper of records: as a: an 
officer of an educational institution responsible for 
registering students, keeping academic records, 
and corresponding with applicants and evaluating 
their credentials b: an admitting officer at a hos- 
pital 




Sherwood A. Barrow, Donna M. Dolan, Associate Registrar. 



127 



Director of 

Student 

Employment 

Help Wanted . . . Equal Opportunity 
Employer . . . minimum wage . . . 
Apply within . . . Experience re- 
quired . . . No phone calls please. 



Counseling 
Center 




Ann Davis Shaw 




Jonathan Ehrenworth (Director), Louise Christian. 

Assertiveness Training . . . Searching for Your Roots . . . Life After Graduation . 
support groups . . . Career Assistant Program. 



128 



Supportive Instructional Services 




Tutoring . . . study skills work- 
shops . . . English cis a Second 
Language . . . Math review for 
graduate examinations . . . 
screening for language dis- 
ability. 



Kim McChesney, Helen Boulware Moore (Director). 



Career Services and Placement Office 



Resumes . . . References . . . 
Recruitment appointments . . . 
Job-hunting workshops . . . 
Data General, ITT, General 
Electric, IBM, Prudential Life, 
Aetna Life, American Frozen 
Foods . . . sweaty palms . . . 
conservative, three-piece suits 
. . . choices. 




Joann O'Donnell Carroll (Director), Nancy Arone. 



129 



Director of 

Activities 

syn ("activity") bustle, 
movement, hum, pother, 
stir, fuss, ado, flurry, hustle- 
bustle, energy, vigor, spirit, 
sparkle, vitality, verve, enter- 
prise, effervescence, animal 
spirits 




Susan Stockton 

Student government . . . liaisons . . . Bermuda trip 
. . . Chorale . . . Black-hispanic Organization . . . 
Microcosm . . . |anus . . . Drama society . . . Ski 
club . . . Pub committee . . . Retailing .... 



130 











a 




^fl 


Mk 




9HRi 


J 


U^^L^^^ 


^^'''uB^B 






i 


^Rrv 


«> ^H 






1 


^ft 1 . 


Iv 




^^p 




^^ ' 


J 




% 




.^^^ ' ^W 




^^ 




fi 






^ 


L 


rm 




JM 


jK 


ii 


s ^^1 


^L 


^^^H ' 


m^^ 


w\ 




^^M^ 


^^^^ 


m\^ 


^ 



Margaret Ann Loeb 



Director of 

Alumnae Affairs 

alumna: singular, feminine 
alumnae: plural, feminine 
alumnus: singular, masculine 
alumni: plural, masculine 



Director of 

Public Information 

Editor of Simmons Review 




Mary Jane Doherty 



131 



Security 



1a: freedom from danger: 
SAFETY b: freedom from fear 
or anxiety c: freedom from 
want or deprivation . . . 4a: 
something that secures: PRO- 
TECTION b: (1) measures 
taken to guard against 
espionage or sabotage, crime, 
attacl<, or escape (2) an 
organization or department 
whose tasl< is security 



Maintenance 




Left to right: John G. Conte (Director), Officer Lenny Durant, 
Sergeant Jeff Maciejowski. 




Seated, left to right: Richard, Ralph, Francis, unknown. Standing: Charlie, Tom, "Big Don". 



132 




Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 
Dire 



133 



SENIOR 
DIRECTORY 

Janice Abercrombie 
35 Bittersweet Lane 
Weston, MA 02193 

Naomi Abromson 
82 Green Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Ruth Abromson 
82 Green Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Melody L. Adam 
33 Madison Avenue 
Wakefield, MA 01880 

Sandra Adier 

1 63 Brevator Street 

Albany, NY 12206 

Dana Albert 
PO Box 87 
Mastic, NY 11950 

Roslyn Altman 
9 Fawn Circle 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Misgana Amelga 

Dix Hall 

Boston, MA 02215 

Laura J. Anderson 
247 Pleasant 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Deborah M. Andrews 
556 W. 156 Street 
New York, NY 10032 

Charlotte Anthony 

17 Munroe Place 

Concord, Massachusetts 01742 

Maia Aparo 

Way Road 

Gloucester, MA 01930 

Elizabeth J. Atkins 
1536 High Street 
Westwood, MA 02090 

Laura Atwood 
29 Stratford Street 
West Roxbury, 
Massachusetts 02132 

Deborah A. Ayvazian 

2 Berkshire Drive 

Winchester, MA 01890 . 



Beryl I. Bailey 

108 Shelton Avenue 

New Haven, CT 06511 

Nancy J. Baird 

508 N. Market Street 

Johnstown, NY 12095 

Beth J. Banks 

407 Walnut Avenue 

Cranford, NJ 07016 

Pamela Barnard 
RD Box 284 
Waitsfield, VT 05673 

Jodie E. Barnett 
41 Smith Street 
Marblehead, MA 01945 

Karen E. Barry 

140 Selden Hill Drive 

West Hartford, CT 06107 

Desiree G. Baynes 
1225 Fairmont Street 202 
Washington, DC 20009 

Christina Bell 
9 Flintlock Lane 
Amhearst, MA 01002 



Christine A. Belsky 
43 Glenn Drive 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 

Nancy H. Benedict 
1 1 1 East Lake Road 
Skaneateles, NY 13152 

Heidi Bennett 

c/o The Hurleys 

75 Red Barn Lane 

East Greenwich, Rl 02818 

Meredith Benson 
Eastern Way 
Purdys, NY 10578 

Lisa S. Bernier 
23 Tyler Road 
Lexington, MA 02173 

Nancy L. Betts 

9909 Kingsbridge Road 

Richmond, VA 23233 

Loren C. Billings 
18 Ivy Lane 
Sherborn, MA 01770 

Sarah M. Blanchard 
9 Llewellyn Place 
Longmeadow, MA 01106 



i 




134 



Kathy M. Boucher 
24 Cherry Hill Terr. 
Waterville, ME 04901 

Barbara W. Bovven 

28 West 

Norwood, MA 02062 

Shelley C. Bovven 
86 Pilgrim Road 
Boston, MA 02215 

Lynne D. Boyles 
947 San Jose Drive 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

Johanna Brassard 
PO Box 495 
Boston, MA 02102 

Felicia Dian Breazile 
1505 Liberty Avenue 
Stillwater, Oklahoma 74074 

Linda Brooks 

147 Elm Street 
Gardner, MA 01440 

Margaret Bryant 
4 Carver Road E. 
Watertown, MA 02172 

Andrea Bucuzzo 
41 Eudora Street 
Haverhill, MA 01830 

Jane Burgarella 

1 1 1 Pokonoket Ave. 

Sudbury, MA 01776 

Carol A. Butler 
1 9 Netta Road 
Dedham, MA 02026 

jane Buyers 

148 Poipu Drive 
Honolulu, HI 96825 

Cathleen Cain 
52 Sylvan Lane 
Weston, MA 



Susan Calaman 
320 Leslie Drive 
Portsmouth, NH 



03801 



Susan M. Cannon 
239 Ferry Street 
Everett, MA 02149 

Marilyn T. Cantor 
29 Adams Street 
Belmont, MA 02178 



Lisa Capparell 

Road #2 Sugarbush Road 

Dalton, PA 18414 

Jennie Cardoza 
8 Goulart Avenue 
Bristol, Rl 02809 

Ellen M. Carmody 
22 Brattle Street 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 

Deanna M. Caron 
230 Pinecrest Road 
Manchester, NH 03104 

Lucille Cartelli 

49 Riverdale Street 

Methuen, MA 01844 

Carolyn Cavanaugh 
278 Perkins Row 
Topsfield, MA 01983 

Therese M. Champion 
19 Clinton Street 
Newport, Rl 02840 

Christine Chepeleff 
293 Vermont Street 
W. Roxbury, MA 02132 

Stephanie Chernyshou 

4 Rustic Drive 

Essex JCT, VT 05452 

Andrea R. Christian 
79 Maple Street 
Greenfield, MA 01301 

Marisol H. Christy 
Rosario Street 
Sawturce, PR 00601 

Wendy M. Ciccatelli 
361 North Street 
Ridgefield, CT 06877 

Bobby Clark 
4 Erie Place 
Boston, MA 02130 

Elizabeth Cleaves 
766 Stevens Ave 
Portland, ME 04101 

Carolyn R. Close 
20 Beckford Street 
Beverly, MA 01915 

Susan E. Coan 
Lincoln Road 
Lincoln, MA 01773 



Heather C. Cohen 
Arnold Hall 
Boston, MA 02215 

Jane L. Cohen 

18 Cameron Place 

New Rochelle, NY 10804 

Linda Colangelo 

62 Sulgrave Road 

W. Hartford, CT 06107 

Christine E. Coleman 
Gardner House 
Boston, MA 02115 

Leslie A. Colonero 
10 Hilltop Drive 
Bedford, MA 01730 

Barbara M. Condon 
6 Arrowhead Road 
Bellingham, MA 02019 

Josephine Conte 

1 74 Chelsea Street 

E. Boston, MA 02128 

Jill Conti 

1 Lojai Blvd 

No. Providence, Rl 02904 

Laurie Copeland 
Stonehedge 
Lincoln, MA 01773 

Karen Coppa 

324 Wood Street 

New Bedford, MA 02745 

Gail A. Corrente 
31 Molloy Street 
Providence, Rl 02908 

Maureen A. Costello 
1 Arbroth Street 
Dorchester, MA 02122 

Patricia Costello 
23 Bradwall Drive 
Convent Station, NJ 07961 

Janine Coveney 

825 Morrison Avenue 

Bronx, NY 10473 

Patricia Creighton 

31 Melwood Avenue 

E. Longmeadow, MA 01028 

Rebecca Crompton 

Box 3946 

Greenville, DE 19807 



135 



Janice Young-Cross 

13 Lefavour Avenue 

Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 

Cindy C. Cuadra 
38-07 100 Street 
Corona, NY 11368 

Marilyn J. Cugini 
51 Damon Avenue 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Rachel B. Cullerton 
212 St. Johns 
Ridgefield, CT 06877 

Jacqueline Daly 

101 Patricia Lane 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Susan P. Dargan 
6 MacArthur Road 
Natick, MA 01760 

Carol Davin 
North Salem Road 
Katonah, NY 10536 

Anne E. DeCossy 

53 Newton Road 
Woodbridge, CT 06525 

Wendell A. Dennis 

54 Oak Street 
Wakefield, MA 01880 

Barbara DePass 
1 2 Fenno Street 
Roxbury, Massachusetts 02119 

Nancy Depev^ 

8 Ivy Street 

West Haven, Connecticut 06516 

Lillian Desantis 
284 Park Street 
Medford, MA 02155 

Barbara Devecis 
30 Willard Road 
Ashburnham, MA 01430 

Lisa Devincenzo 
1 5 Rosemary Road 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Debbie Devries 

1011 Santa Cruz SE 

E. Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

Maribeth Devries 
Williams Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 

Susan Dieter 

56 Olde Lantern Road 

Bedford, NH 03102 



Susan E. DiFronzo 
62 Stanley Avenue 
Medford, MA 02155 

Nneka H. Dike 
44 Hillcrest Road 
Belmont, MA 02178 

Diane E. Dobrowski 
242 Robbins Street 
Milton, MA 02186 

Anne Doherty 
285 Dean Road 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Kathleen Doherty 
141 Beacon Street 
Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Eileen Doyle 
8 Warren Road 
Townsend, MA 01469 

Sophie Drescher 
PO Box 1 1 6 
Elsah, IL 62028 

Ann-Marie K. Duffy 
2 Wallace Court 
Charlestown, MA 02129 

Pandora C. Dumas 

108 OIney Road 
Wethersfield, CT 06109 

Kathleen Dziewisz 
123 Penney Drive 
E. Hartford, CT 06118 

Nancy Edmonds 

683 Washington Street #7 

Brookline, MA 02146 

Mary A. Edson 

109 Chestnut Street 
West Haven, CT 06516 

Susan E. Edwards 

Box 279 

East Orleans, MA 02643 

Diane E. Efstratiou 
4 Fernwood Road 
Saugus, MA 01906 

Barbara F. Elias 

800 Bearse's Way 5 EF 

Hyannis, MA 02601 

Wendy Ellison 
343 West Street 
Stoughton, MA 02072 



Ellen G. Eluto 

1 90 Kearney Street 

Manchester, NH 03104 

Martha R. Eshoo 
1015 Chestnut Street 
Manchester, NH 03104 

Elizabeth L. Ferber 
4 Hines Way 
Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Kristin B. Fernald 
Todd Pond Road 
Lincoln, MA 01773 

Lourdes Fernandez 
13 N 16 Rio Canas 
Ponce, PR 00731 

Julie A. Fernie 

RED 2 Cambridge Road 

Bedford, NH 03102 

Carley Ferren 

58 Dane Street #2 

Somerville, MA 02143 

Janice Fish 

1 640 Worchester Road 

Framingham, MA 01701 

Rebecca Fishbein 
20 Brookside Place 
Hillsdale, NJ 07642 

Patrice F. Fitzpatrick 
63 Muller Road 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Sally Fogel 
65 Harwich Road 
Chestnut Hill, 
Massachusetts 02167 

Robin Francis 
1 7 Wales Street 
Boston, MA 02124 

Judi P. Frankel 

62 Joan Drive 

New City, NY 10956 

Susan Freedman 

371 Pepper Ridge Road 

Stamford, CT 06905 

Tia Freeman 

75 St. Alphonsus Street 

Boston, MA 02120 

Lynne French 

3 Andrews Avenue 

Manchester, MA 01944 



01945 



136 



Nancy A. Fuller 
27 Sullivan Drive 
Redding, CT 06896 

Jeanne M. Gallery 
33 13th Road 
Marshfield, MA 02065 

Angelica Gamilis 
4 Brow Hill Road 
Somers, CT 06071 

JoAnne Gamilis 
4 Brown Hill Road 
Somers, CT 06071 



Catherine Geanoulis 
6 Little River Road 
Exeter, NH 03833 

Lisa N. Gelles 

2485 Wimbledon Road 

Columbus, OH 43220 

Marylou Gendron 
332 Morris Street 
Southbridge, MA 01550 

Mary A. Gillis 

20 Lexington Street 

Dover, NH 03820 



Naomi Griffith 

24 S. Huntington Avenue 

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 



Jill S. Gross 
218 Maple Street 
Framingham, MA 



01701 



Elizabeth Grundy 
147 Main Street 
Foxborough, MA 02035 

Lee Guilfoyle 
2 Hickory Lane 
Canton, MA 02021 



Manuela Gani 
359 Tappan Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Nancy Gardner 
14 Sunset Drive 
S. Easton, MA 02375 

Laurie L. Gatz 
1800 Sound Avenue 
Mattituck, NY 11952 



Gloria Glass 

55 Welland Road 

Brookline, MA 02146 

Nancy S. Goldsmith 

South Harpswell 

South Harpswell, ME 04079 

Maureen H. Greaney 
43 Butler Street 
Dorchester, MA 02124 



Mary C. Haley 
19 Chase Street 
Woburn, MA 01801 

Monica Y. Hamagami 
8090 Kugler Mill Road 
Cincinnati, OH 45243 

Clara Hanak 
210 Forest Street 
Norwell, MA 02061 




137 




Lori Hanninen 

4820 Glenwood Street 

Duluth, MN 55804 

Laura E. Hansen 
2711 Grandview Lane 
Cold Springs, CO 80909 

Lisa Harris 

19 Clover Lane 

Westport, CT 06880 

Carole M. Hawk 
293 Main Street 
Calais, ME 04619 

Christine Hays 

1 8 Cowasset Lane 
Waltham, MA 02154 

Margaret Hazerjian 

1 9 Woodard Road 

W. Roxbury, MA 02132 

Beverly Heller 

85 Strathnnore Road Apt. 

Brighton, MA 02135 



Michelle R. Hersch 
1 Joyce Lane 
Woodbury, NY 1 1 797 

Jean A. Hetzel 

1221 Wightnnan Street 

Pittsburgh, PA 15217 

Noreen Higgins 
56 Berwick Street 
Worcester, MA 01602 

Cynthia Hill 
4 Country Drive 
Weston, MA 02193 

Michelle R. Hoberman 
2035 Connm. Avenue 
Brighton, MA 02135 

Nancy G. Hooper 
34 Marcia Road 
Wilmington, MA 01887 

Deborah Howard 
226 Comm. Avenue 
Boston, MA 02116 



Woodrina Humphries 
C/O Linda Burke 
Corona, NY 11368 

Nancy E. Hyde 
35 Odgen Road 
Brookline, MA 02167 

Carol D. James 

68 North Ridge Road 

Ipswich, MA 01938 

Karen Jenkins 
396 Thoreau Street 
Concord, MA 01742 

Kimberly Jennings 
467 Comm. Avenue 
Boston, MA 02215 

Cynthia Jessel 

545 Wayland Avenue 

Providence, Rhode Island 

Annette Johnson 
19731 S W 117 Court 
Miami, FL 33177 



02906 



138 



JoAnne M. Jonah 
19 Virginia Terr 
Lynn, MA 01904 

Jessica A. Kenn 
28 Rose Avenue 
Watertown, MA 02172 

Charlene M. Kennedy 

Notch Hill Road 

N. Branford, CT 06471 

Marjaneh Keramaty 
8 1 2th Street Bokharest 
Tehran Iran 



Linda J. Keyes 
11710 SW 67th Court 
Miami, FL 33156 

Nita Kim 

132 Anzio Road 

Athol, MA 01331 

Lisa B. King 
33 Keans Road 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Margaret Kirkpatric 
5 Francis Circutt 
Winchester, MA 01890 

Susan J. Kline 

1411 Runnymede Road 

Norfolk, VA 23505 

Dawn Klinker 
56 Roseland Terr 
Longmeadow, MA 01106 

Katherin Koki 
27 EInora Drive 
Worcester, MA 01606 

Diane Kolligian 

11 Williamsburg Drive 

Orange, CT 06477 

Gail G. Konchagulian 
1 1 Oriole Drive 
Milford, MA 01757 

Paula Kotsopoulos 
30 Olean Street 
Worcester, MA 01602 

Nanci G. Krasker 
46 Brewster Road 
Medford, MA 02155 

Elizabeth Krawiec 
93 Griffin Street 
Bondsville, MA 01009 



Jennifer F. Krusen 
69 Depot Road 
Boxborough, MA 01719 

Mary Kutlowski 
1 Ashbrook Drive 
Hampton, NH 03842 

JoAnne Laferriere 

3067 Pawtucket Avenue 

Riverside, Rl 02915 

Cynthia Laiacona 

204 Brandywyne Drive 

E. Boston, MA 02128 

Linda E. LaMontagne 
19 LaSalle Avenue 
Lawrence, MA 01843 

Pamela Langevin 
46 Hinckley Road 
Milton, MA 02187 

Barbara Lawrence 

5 D Street C/O Saunders 

Natick, MA 01760 

Brenda LaZare 
15 Aberdeen Avenue 
Westmount, Quebec 
Canada 1t3y3A5 

Patricia A. Leahy 

1 54 Pond Street 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Debbie LeClaire 
Gaskill Street 
Mendon, MA 01756 

Monique Legros 
243 Broadway #504 
Cambridge, MA 02139 

Nancy Lemere 
1 2 Alcott Street 
Acton, MA 01720 

Claudette Lemieux 
626 Benefit Street 
Pawtucket, Rl 02861 

Nina N. Leon 

7 Greenwood Road 

Arlington, MA 02174 

Lisa Levenson 

40 Harvard Avenue 

Brookline, MA 

Karen J. Levins 

94 Beacon Hill Drive 

West Hartford, CT 06117 



Julie A. Lightbourn 
PO Box N236 
Bahamas 

Diane Lindemann 
311 N. Harvard Street 
Allston, MA 02134 

Maureen A. Linnane 
214 Park Street 
Stoneham, MA 02180 

Jayne L. Lipman 

6 Colonel Bell Drive 

Brockton, MA 02401 

Lisa B. Litin 

22 Kennedy Road 

Sharon, MA 02067 

J. Lisa Lundberg 
Deer Run Road 
Farmington, CT 06032 

Melissa Mack 
39 Red Hill Road 
Princeton, NJ 08540 

Mary Macri 

16 Leamington Road 

Brighton, MA 02135 

Anat Madanes 
48 Hereford Street 
Boston, MA 02115 

Anuradha Mahindra 
14 Altamount Road 
Bombay, India 400026 

Mary E. Malloy 

73 Canterbury Street 

Hartford, CT 06112 

Cheryl Mancuso 
3 Saville Street 
Saugus, MA 01906 

Lara Margoshes 
24 Glendale Road 
Marblehead, MA 01945 

Lisa J. Marocco 

960 Johnston Street 

N. Andover, MA 01845 

Jill R. Maron 
535 Kelsey Street 
Middletown, CT 06457 

Brenda Maxwell 

60 Kendall Street #603 

Boston, MA 02118 



139 



Barbara Mazzi 
123 Kent Street #2 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Pauline Mbawuike 

103 Blake Street 

Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Mercedes McAndrew 

29 Ramsey Street 
Dorchester, MA 02125 

Sheila McCabe 

1 Westview Ter. 
Newton, MA 02165 

Elizabeth Mclnerney 
25 Kenilworth Strett 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 

Jean E. McKay 

1 1 Waverly Place 
Montvale, NJ 07645 

Teresa A. McKeon 
68 Cypress Drive 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Laurie McLaughlin 

213 E. Washington Street 

Hanson, MA 02341 

Kathryn McNeil 
1109 Milford 
Houston, TX 77006 

Susan E. McPherson 
142 State Road 
Eliot, ME 03903 

Donna Marie Medeiros 
252 North Brow Street 
East Providence 
Rhode Island 02914 

Laurie Hamblet Messina 

30 Milton Street 
North Andover, 
Massachusetts 01845 

Melinda L. Metcalf 
235 Park Drive Apt. 1 
Bosion, MA 02215 

Cheryl A. Miller 

P.O. Box 200 

Roxbury, Massachusetts 02119 

Cynthia L. Miller 
4 Waco Circle 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 

Alourdes Monestime 
135 School Street 
Boston, MA 02130 



Katina P. Morakis 

C/O Heublein Corporation 

Farmington, CT 06032 

Mary F. Moro 
7 Cunniff Avenue 
Milford, MA 01757 

Kathleen S. Mullane 
1 02 East Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Catherine A. Murphy 
1 1 2 Errol Road 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Colleen Murphy 
Sutton Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 

Mary Foss Murphy 
7 Oakland Avenue 
Rockport, MA 01966 

Jeanne A. Naulty 
22 Sharpe Road 
Belmont, MA 02178 

Caria Nazzaro 
267 Hanover Street 
Boston, MA 02113 

Barbara Neumann 
7709 Glenmore SP WY 
Bethesda, MD 20034 

Jodi L. Newberg 
75 Archer Street 
Lynn, MA 01902 

Margaret E. Newton 
3600 W. Mystic Vly P 
Medford, MA 02155 

Victoria M. Nicholas 
1 Brookside Circle 
Bronxville, NY 10708 

Marie A. Nichols 
30 Berkeley Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Brenda Nightingale 
1 West Street 
Methuen, MA 01844 

Andrea Yath Nip 
1 746 Akaakoa Street 
Kailua, HI 96734 

Christine Niswander 
57 LaMoille Avenue 
Bradford, MA 01830 



Nancy L. O'Brien 
R12 Washington Street 
Manchester, MA 01944 

Cassandra October 

168 Allston Street 

Allston, Massachusetts 02134 

Elizabeth R. O'Day 
6 Turtle Lane 
Dover, MA 02030 

JoAnne O'Keeffe 
14 Roman Road 
Woburn, MA 01801 

Patricia H. O'Rourke 
47 Shumway Street 
Amherst, MA 01002 

Charmaine J. Oliver 
55 Elm Hill Avenue 
Dorchester, MA 02121 

Page F. Oliver 

1946 Glen Rock Street 

Yorktown, NY 10598 

Jean E. Olsson 
21 Juniper Lane 
Glastonbury, CT 06033 

Katherine A. Orcutt 

21 Somerston Road 
Yorktown Hts, NY 10598 

Sharon M. Orel 
6 Marilyn Drive 
Canton, MA 02021 

Carol Palasek 

4 MT Vernon Street 

Dorchester, MA 02125 

Michelle Papazian 

691 North Euclid Avenue 

Upland, California 91786 

Susan Peecher 

1 6 Cherry Street 
Warren, Rl 02885 

Maria R. Pennachio 

17 Columbus Road 
Woburn, MA 01801 

Kimberly C. Phillips 

22 Old Derry Road RED 6 
Hudson, NH 03051 

Ellen S. Pickard 
406 NE 7th Avenue 
Gainesville, FL 32601 



140 



Judith A. Picone 
247 Whitford Avenue 
Providence, Rl 02903 

Suanne D. Piecuch 
334 E. High Street 
Manchester, NH 03104 

Hillery Plotkin 
Kennedy Drive 
Colchester, CT 06415 

Ruth H. Podlenski 
77 Foster Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 

Linda M. Porada 
65 Elm Street 
Hatfield, MA 01038 

Nancy Porcello 
426 Chestnut Street 
Ashland, MA 01721 

Cynthia L. Proctor 
37 Hampton Drive 
Nashua, NH 03060 



Tracy Proctor 

1 1 Boston Post Road 

Old Lyme, CT 06371 

Barbara A. Puis 

13 Greenwood Street 

Waterville, ME 04901 

Ellen Quan 

8 Arrowhead Road 

Weston, Massachusetts 02193 

Kimberly Quinlan 
337 West Street 
Lunenburg, MA 01462 

Susan F. Rao 

4658 Hanford Street 

Douglaston, NY 11362 

Carolyn Rea 

55 Graymore Road 

Waltham, MA 02154 

Catherine Reponen 
"Oude Gracht" 13 
2070 Ekeren, Belgium 



Denise Richardson 
123 Angell Avenue 
Cranston, Rl 02920 

Karen j. Richter 
114 Abby Lane 
Portland, ME 04103 

Lisa M. Rickards 
Tallwood Terr. 
Gorham, ME 04038 

Vanessa Ripps 

42 Sylvan Way 

W. Caldwell, Nj 07006 

Karen Marie Roberts 
917 Keene Street 
Duxberry, MA 02332 

Carolyn Robinson 
38 Ridgeway Drive 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Elaine Robinson 

45 E. 89th Street Apt. 5F 

New York, NY 10028 

Wanda Robinson 

70 Stetson Street 

Braintree, MA 02184 




141 




^kTSi^SOft^^l, 



Christine Rockwell 
22 Elmwood Drive 
Cumberland, Rl 02864 

Maria Antoni Romero 
83 Caribe Street 
Santurce, PR 00907 

Janet Rosen 

384 Riverway Apt 4 

Roxbury, MA 02115 

Paige Rosenblatt 
16 Rose Avenue 
Marblehead, MA 01945 

JoAnne Rosengard 
103 Evans Road 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Gilda M. Rossi 
67 Halstead Street 
Saugus, MA 01906 

Vula Kalambokis Roumis 
96 Esty Farm Road 
Newton, MA 02159 

Sydney Rubin 

28 Middleby Road 

Lexington, MA 02173 



Winnie Rubino 
78 Addington Road 
Brookline, MA 02146 



Jolee Russas 
1 June Way 
Little Compton, 



Rl 02837 



Laurie Ruttenberg 
88 Slater Avenue 
Providence, Rl 02906 

JoAnne J. Sakellarides 
186 Laurel Road 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 

Lisa A. Salusti 
110 Kendall Road 
Lexington, MA 02173 

Jenni A. Santillo 

5 Windward Avenue 

White Plains, NY 10605 



Donna Sapsowitz 
5816 Etiwanda 
Tarzana, California 



91356 



Ellyn Sartucci 

1 3 Governor Andrew Road 

Hingham, Massachusetts 02043 



Patricia Saxby 

Box 394 

N. Conway, NH 



03860 



Susan Schenck 

75 Fox Den Road 
Glastonbury, CT 06033 

Ann Schnaper 
3215 Sterling Road 
Birmingham, Al 35213 

Alicia Scott 

2774 Crayton Road 

Naples, Florida 33940 

Fern Selesnick 
38 Grand Avenue 
Newburgh, NY 12550 

Ellen P. Settimelli 

134 F4eritage Lane 

E. Weymouth, MA 02189 

Susan J. Shapiro 

76 Fern Street 
Auburn, ME 04210 

Christine Shea 
57 Boulder Road 
Manchester, CT 06040 



142 



Kathleen A. Sheehan 
190 Nevins Avenue 
Longmeadow, MA 01106 

Terry Sheingold 

156 Highland Avenue 

Newton, MA 02160 



Jamie Shevell 

51 Aberfoyle Road 

New Rochelle, NY 



10804 



Kyra Shoffner 
10 Phinney Road 
Lexington, MA 02173 



Deborah Sibilio 
54 Salem Road 
White Plains, NY 



10603 



Gladys Sierra 

730 E. 166 Street 4A 

Bronx, NY 10456 

Kathryn A. Siliski 
15 Grandview Terr. 
Rutland, VT 05701 



Marie Silvia 
Sea Spray Way 
Little Compton, 



Rl 02837 



Kathleen Simard 
1 10 Rogers Avenue 
Barrington, Rl 02806 

Kim M. Simmons 

296 Blair Mill Road AP 

Horshan, PA 19044 

Kathryn C. Simonetti 
12 The Crossing 
Armonk, NY 10504 

Jami L. Slabine 
32 Alberta Road 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 

Deborah L. Slason 

90 Gainsborough Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02115 

Pamela Sloane 
40 Bird Street 
Boston, MA 02125 



Rachel G. Small 
95 John Street 
Newport, Rl 02840 

Barbara Smith 

284 Rindge Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 02140 

Heather Smith 
222 Hersey Street 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Janet L. Smith 

54 Ivy Road 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Kathleen Smyth 
15 Alice Road 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Elizabeth E. Snow 
148 Ipswich Road 
Boxford, MA 01921 

Mary K. Snow 
1137 Union Street 
Manchester, NH 03104 




143 



■•*»». 



/ 



Leslie D. Solman 
2 Home Farm Road 
Caribou, ME 04736 

Eda Sonis 

1 1 80 Beacon Street 

Newton Highlands, MA 02161 

Susan H. Souris 

895 Edgemont Park 

Crosse Pointe Park, Ml 48230 

Donna Speaks 
51 Salmon Street 
Providence, Rl 02909 

Nancy E. Spelbrink 
31 Outlook Drive 
Darien, CT 06820 

Suann Spellman 
27 Crandfield Street 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Ellen Spiegel 

250 Evandale Road 

Scarsdale, NY 10583 

Mary Anne Squillace 
287 Hempstead Avenue 
Rockville Center, NY 11570 

Heather Stewart 
10 Eastbrook Drive 
Nashua, NH 03060 

Laura Stewart 

61 Vandenburg Avenue Ap 

Troy, NY 12180 

Sara Stohn 

85 Revere Street #3 

Boston, Massachusetts 02114 

Lisa Stone 

18 Rainbow Pond Drive 

Walpole, MA 02081 

Sheila M. Sullivan 
6 Thaxton Road 
Beverly, MA 01915 

Holly Sutherland 

262 N. Main Street 

S. Yarmouth, MA 02664 

Karen Swan 

37 Maynard Street 

Northborough, 

Massachusetts 01532 

Caria M. Swanson 
5 Spruce Street 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

144 




s j^ o '7: 



i 





Maryelaine Taddeo 

74 Eliot Street 

S. Natick, MA 01760 

Heidi A. Tammik 
14 Oak Circle 
Merrimac, MA 01860 

Nancy Tanner 

95 Concord Street 

Needham, Massachusetts 02194 

Lea S. Tanz 

20 Portnella Avenue 

New Rochelle, NY 10804 

Donna M. Thompson 
14 Leonard Avenue 
Cambridge, MA 02139 



Rosa Wai Yin To 
Tamarac Trail 
Harrison, New York 



10528 



Susan A. Toyias 

114 Valentine Street 

W. Newton, MA 02165 

Helaine S. Trachtenberg 
120 White Oak Drive 
Longmeadow, MA 01106 



1 


9T1 


M 


1 

i 


^ ^ '** '^^^" 


II 





Pamela Sarah Tucker 
51 Coachman Drive 
Branford, CT 06405 

Cynthia L. Tulloch 
1337 Rockdale Avenue 
New Bedford, MA 02740 

Donna M. Turner 
241 William Street 
E. Orange, NJ 07017 

Tricia A. Tyler 

22 Mountain Avenue 

Lewiston, ME 04240 

Deborah A. Upton 
80 Cedar Street 
Lexington, MA 02173 

Mary Ann Vaccaro 
103 Dewolf Avenue 
Bristol, R.I. 02809 

Ana Valle-Bachrach 
6 Soldiers Field #415 
Boston, MA 02163 



Jacqueline Van Tol 
1 7 Stone Root Lane 
Sudbury, MA 01776 

Pauline Venzen 

Bl D C Apt 141 Bovon 

St. Thomas, VI 00801 

Marianne Vozeolas 
86 Pentucket Avenue 
Lowell, MA 01852 

Susan Wadman 
3 Duff Drive 
Enfield, CT 06082 

Jocelyn Wallace 
6 Summer Street 
Newton Upper Fal, MA 



02164 



Susan A. Webb 

6033 S. Michigan Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637 

Elise S. Weis 

144 Thornberry Drive 

Pittsburgh, PA 15235 

Judith L. Weiss 
38 Cranford Place 
Cresskill, NJ 07626 

Rae M. Wells 
625 Walkhill Street 
Mattapan, MA 02126 

Amy White 

1711 East Bank Drive 

Marietta, GA 30067 



Irene C. Wong 
84 Ellison Park 
Waltham, MA 02154 

Terry Woo 

97 St. Stephen Street 

Boston, MA 02115 

Regina M. Wood 
52 Cleveland Street 
Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Valerie Worle 
Route 5, Box 274 
LaCrange, Georgia 30240 

Lynda Wynn 

80 Norris Road RFD 1 

Buzzards Bay, MA 02532 




Marguerite Walmsley 
26 Tryon Avenue 
Rumford, Rl 02916 

Eve Walworth 

41 Old Farm Road 

Darien, CT 

Mariangela Ward 
88-50 1 79th Street 
Jamaica, NY 11432 

Lorraine Warner 
8 Sunrise Terr 
Westfield, MA 01085 

Marvia Watt 
81 Dupont Street 
Presque Isle, ME 04769 

Cynthia Weare 

60 Hill Hollow Road 

Watching, NJ 07060 



Susanna Whitman 
31 Turning Mill Road 
Lexington, MA 02173 

Barbara Wickersham 
54 Pilgrim Road 
Boston, MA 02215 

Cynthia A. Williams 
22 Davis Street 
Saugus, MA 01906 

LuAnne L. Williams 
Depot Hill Road 
Cobalt, CT 06414 

Elisa J. Wojtusik 
57 Burton Street 
Bristol, CT 06010 

Dianne Wong 
560 Tremont Street 
Boston, MA 02118 



Catherine Yee 
32 Powell Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Donna M. Yee 
26 Hundreds Road 
Westboro, MA 

Patricia M. Yuu 
26 Arvidson Road 
Lynn, MA 01904 

Marci Ziff 

385 Bellevue Road 

New Haven, CT 06511 

Elaine Zouzas 
1 73 Proctor Road 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 

Patricia Zur 

128 Carltonclub Drive 

Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 



145 



The 1 98 1 Microcosm Staff 




Sitting: Heather Smith, Lisa DeVincenzo, Marilyn Cugini, Cathy Geanoulis. Standing: Becky Schnaper, 
Natalie Gilson, Nancy Fuller, Sarah Sheafe Tucker, Ana Valle-Bachrach, Susan McNeff, Holly Sutherland. 



146 



Patrons 



Carolyn Andrews 

Johanna Brassard 

Charles Crompton, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aldo Cugini 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor W. Devecis 

Mr. and Mrs. Salvatore A. 

DeVincenzo 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis R. 

Dobrowski 
Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow W. 

Drescher 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. 

Edmonds 
Virginia H. Eshoo 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Fuller 



Mr. and Mrs. John R. Grundy 
Dr. and Mrs. Macey H. Keyes 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. LaFerriere 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Malloy 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Morakis 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Orcutt 
Lyndle Peecher 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Ruttenberg 
Ann Rebecca Schnaper 
Mr. and Mrs. Cole B. Smith 
Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Richard 

Sonis 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred A. Spelbrink 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Weiss 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Zouzas 




147 



r 



GOOD LUCK 



^ 




PROUD TO BE YOUR FOOD SERVICE 






Hospital Center Pharmacy 
433 Brookline Ave., Boston 

566-3700 

Open Mon-Fri 8 am-llpm 

Weekends and Holidays 9 am-9 pm 

• cosnnetics & gifts • tobacco 

• health & beauty aids • prescriptions 

•photo supplies & processing 
• greeting cards & party goods 
It is our pleasure to cash Simmons College 
students' checks day or night with student I.D. 



A 



r 



^ 




John Stracuzzi, 
Branch Officer 



\^Mi^ 



The 

Boston 

Five 



Member FDIC DIFM 



Brookline Avenue 

at Joslin Road 

277-5813 

277-5813 



r 



CHUCKS SUB 
SHOPPE 



Under 50 Billion Sold 




566-9405 




N/i — f\Bm\ cC^oi 



-451 Brookline Ave -Near Simmons 
-Open 7am- 10pm Every Day 



V 



148 



V 



Best Wishes and Congratulations 
to the Class of 1981 

from the class of 1984 



^ r 




V 



r 



Simmons Review Salutes 



The Class of 1981 



See you In class notes! 



98 Drookline Ave. 
Dosron 



A r 



J V 



^ r 




Food &Druik 



Doum Under 



Entertainment Nightly 

Mon. Zypher 

Tues. Stump Brothers 

Wed. Spring Rain 

(Ladies' Night) 

free carnation & door prizes 
Thurs. Spring Rain 
Fri. & Sat. Real Good Entertainment 
Sun. Gordy Milne 

(Cape Cod Night) 



J K 



Best Wishes and Congratulations 
to the Class of 1981 

from the Class of 1982 



COMPLIMENTS 
of the 



A 



CHARLES RIVER 

VALLEY SIMMONS 

CLUB 



Wellesley 

Dedham 

Medfield 

Needham 
Westwood 
Norwood 
The Newtons 

Weston 

Dover 

Walpole 



149 



Congratulations 
to the class of 1981 



from S. P.A.N. 
(Simmons Professional Alumnae Network) 

and 
The Alumnae Association 



V 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 1981 



from S.G.A. 
(Student Government Association) 



150 



Congratulations 

to the Class of 1981 

from 



Lehman Brothers Kuhn Loeb, Inc 



133 Federal Street, Boston 02110 



V 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 1981 



A r 



from the Cask 'n 
Flagon 



62 Brookline Avenue 



J K. 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 1981 



From South Shore Buick 

"Reputation is Everything" 
A Key Buick Dealer in Eastern Massachusetts 

50 Adams Street, Quincy 472-4520 



151 



What do you remember most 
about . . . 

. . . Freshman Year? 




"A feeling of independence (of a sort)." 
Pandora Dumas 

"A dynamite social life complete with frat 
parties (which are no fun after the first year 
— but at the time they're great!") Susan 
Freedman 

"The endless boring intro classes." Jessica 
Kenn 




"The beginning of the renovations." 

"Homesickness, my first dorm meeting, frat parties, 
my first all-nighter, eating non-stop." 

"Orientation week — hot as hell!" Sharon Orel 

"Simmons was not only my new academic school, but 
also a new cultural place, because it represented 
America to me; and I got to know American people 
closely." Marjaneh Keramaty 




153 



The Blizzard of 78 




"Making snow sculptures on the 
quad." Kimberly Phillips 

"Calling out for pizza." 

"Not having any hot water, or heat 
or electricity and then having to 
stand in line at Star Market." Susan 
Calaman 

"Trying to get a suntan from the 
reflection from the snow." Lisa De- 
Vincenzo 

Traffic bans." 

"Pictures of cars stuck on Rte. 
128." 

"Shoveling out." 

"Cabin fever." 

"Mike Dukakis and all his swea- ' 
ters." 



154 




"My first clinical day, in full dress uniform and scared to death, yet 
filled with excitement." Kimberly Phillips 

"Having mono and making up all the missed work; getting lost 
trying to find Nickerson field." Susan Calaman 





1 



m 





"My disappointment when the old-fashioned bathrooms dis- 
appeared from MCB." Suzanne Piecuch 



. . . Sophomore 
Year? 




"Breaking up with my Hometown 

Honey." 

"Deciding a major." 

"Going to an '! hate Ed King' party 

at Emerson College two days before 

the drinking age went up." Meg 

Walmsley 



ITC««w» 





. . . junior 
Year? 

"Registration for the draft." Cassandra 
October 




iKiaff^^i^i 



"Second semester spent on a 

study abroad program in Israel 

— also spent time backpacking 

through Europe — best seven 

months of my life!" Susan 
Freedman 




'Iran — Hostage situation." 




156 



"Discovering where everything is in Boston." Dana Albert 



"Changing my major." 




"Spending nine hours in the rain at the Boston Commons to see Pope John Paul II 
weeks afterwards." Meg Walmsley 



the glee I had for two 






, ^Make it in ^ 

Massachusetts 



,£g, 



157 



. . . Senior Year? 

"Graduation — what else!" Nancy Gardner 
"Voting in my first presidential election." Jessica Kenn 
"Too many decisions." 




"Resumes, cover letter, Placement Office — anxiety — working 
harder! — dreams." Pandora Dumas 

"The egocentric high of having the freshmen stare at you as if 
were a celebrity — my single — my sanity." 

"My anxiety about what will happen when I leave this safe 
environment." 






"Career goals." Jessica L 
Wasseth 

"NewWave," 

"Being busy constantly and still not 
going totally insane." Meg 
Wamsley 



158 



What do you think you will 
remember most about Simmons? 



"The rising tuition costs." 
"Dorm life and Bartol Hall." 




"Some incredible friendships I've made; four years of 
great and very rapid changes in personality outlook, 
lifestyle." Susan Freedman 

"The close society of women who support one 
another to seek goals and reach potentials." Jessica 
Kenn 

"Feeling more positive about myself as a woman." 




"The people I have met — lived with, worked 
with, and studied with ... a realization of 
personal growth . . . teas." Pandora Dumas 

"The Fens, mailboxes, lockers." 




"The glimmers of wisdom that brought 
learning and living together." 



159 





I 




"I think I will most remember the 
unique way Simmons offers 
training in both professional 
areas, and in liberal arts. 
This tends to make Simmons 
students less 'technocrats' and 
more able to enjoy a career and 
life in general." 



160 














•^?. 

^'> 






V: 






a 







JjK/Op.*?- 



% 



■•- '^^^-^ 









<^e 



»> 



^z'. 



^•p. '^z 


















''♦a 



X "' ' S'"-/Jf' v/ "<' ''^^< 









•'^ 



#^^" 






^.^ 











"( 















5<r 



, it 






6. ■*■ *'' 



.4f ^c.'-?* 




Vj 



; 






V X 



V. 



fVi 




^^i^'>\-^ % % % %. 









\y^ 



v^ ^^. <«.. *«>. ^ 






0* e, 









""^ "t ^<) 



.x<^~ 







iS^ <^C> 



V* T 



.# 






.^'